cryptocurrency
bitcoin
An electronic money system based on blockchain technology and secured encryption.
open source money system FAQ Guide
what do you know about
cryptocurrency
Cryptocurrency is broadly a digital asset (100% electronic), secured with cryptography and recorded on a distributed ledger to enable trusted transactions. It’s decentralized, which means it’s not owned or controlled by any person, government or other organization. Instead, all the users together are in control. Blockchain is the underlying technology for most cryptocurrencies, functioning as a ‘ledger’ or record of transactions made.
Crypto
A digital asset (100% electronic) secured with cryptography and recorded on a distributed ledger to enable trusted transactions
Blockchain
When you purchase crypto your ownership records are stored electronically in a blockchain database (ledger)
Bitcoin
 Bitcoin is a specific cryptocurrency and an open-source monetary system for storing and transmitting an asset of value
What you need to know
Cryptocurrency
PURCHASE

Anyone can purchase crypto through dedicated exchanges and a growing number of financial institutions. These exchanges or financial institutions typically charge a fee based on the size of your transaction.

USAGE

You can buy, sell and use cryptocurrency to buy services or goods. You can also use it for international remittances, borrow against it and/or as a potential store of value.

Cost-Fees

These exchanges or financial institutions typically charge a fee based on the size of your transaction. A “wallet” is created (an app) to represent the balances of the cryptocurrency sitting on the blockchain.

Transactions

If purchasing cryptocurrency through an exchange or financial institution, you cannot use the cryptocurrency to transact. Most only allow buying, selling, and holding crypto.

VALUE

There is no central authority that maintains a crypto’s value. As a result, the value can go up and down very quickly. For that reason, buying crypto as an investment can be risker than others.

TAXATION

Virtual currency is treated as property and general tax principles applicable to property transactions apply to transactions using virtual currency.

open source-blockchain
question-answer

Most cryptocurrencies are based on blockchain technology. Blockchain is a database (ledger) that stores information differently from the way a typical database does. It collects information in sets, or “blocks.” When the blocks are filled, they’re connected, or “chained”, to the previous blocks and can’t be changed. The transaction and verification processes use mathematical algorithms, which makes them more secure. All this information is duplicated and stored electronically across multiple computers (nodes). The system makes it nearly impossible to change or hack. So, when you purchase crypto, your ownership records are stored electronically.

They were originally intended to be used as a store of value, unit of account, or medium of payment between people for products and services purchased. As cryptocurrencies have evolved and new cryptocurrencies have been created the purposes/use cases have evolved as well, and different cryptocurrencies have different use cases/purposes. Some cryptocurrencies (such as Ethereum, Cardano, and Solana) even serve as innovation platforms which others can build new applications on.

Bitcoin is a specific cryptocurrency and an open-source monetary system for storing and transmitting an asset of value and is the world’s largest and most recognized digital asset. Bitcoin is managed by its users and enables financial transactions on a peer-to-peer network basis. Transactions are verified, recorded, and secured on a public ledger called a “blockchain.” Bitcoin was the original cryptocurrency, first launched in 2008.

Most cryptocurrency relies on innovations in computer science, such as digital signatures and cryptographic hashing, and combines them in a unique manner that is reinforced by economic incentives. Digital signatures provide strong control of assets, while cryptographic hashing and the economic incentives of mining or staking assure that no one entity controls the network and that transactions between users are valid.

No. The buying and selling of cryptocurrency is not insured by the National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund (NCUSIF) or the FDIC. Crypto assets are not insured, contain no guarantee, and may lose value.

The value of cryptocurrencies can change rapidly. Much like anything that holds value, supply and demand play a big factor in the market price. There is no central authority that maintains a crypto’s value. As a result, the value can go up and down very quickly. For that reason, buying crypto as an investment can be riskier than others. Some cryptocurrencies (known as stablecoins) can be pegged to the USD and be fully collateralized and thus don’t fluctuate as much as other cryptocurrencies. Not all stablecoins are fully collateralized and thus carry great risk than holding the equivalent amount in USD.

You can buy, sell and use cryptocurrency to buy services or goods, you can also use it for international remittances, borrow against it, and/or as a potential store of value. Anyone can purchase crypto through dedicated exchanges and a growing number of financial institutions. These exchanges or financial institutions typically charge a fee based on the size of your transaction. A “wallet” is created (an app) to represent the balances of the cryptocurrency sitting on the blockchain.

Contact your tax preparer for tax advice.

Cryptocurrency is volatile by nature. Because crypto generates no cash flow, traders rely on changes in sentiment to drive the price. Unlike the U.S. dollar, there’s no central authority that maintains the crypto’s value. As a result, the value can go up and down very quickly. For that reason, buying crypto as an investment can be much riskier than other assets.

Generally, if purchasing cryptocurrency though an exchange or financial institution, you cannot use the cryptocurrency to transact. Most only allow buying, selling, and holding crypto.

Yes. However, compared to other industrial consumers of energy, digital asset mining is notably sustainable, and transparently so. According to the Bitcoin Mining Council’s latest Q1 survey of miners, which consists of a bottom-up analysis of 50% of current hash-rate, Bitcoin miners surveyed use 64.6% sustainable energy (defined as wind, solar, hydro, or nuclear). An increasing number of mining companies now use renewable sources, such as geothermal energy or solar power, to power their operations. Sustainable bitcoin mining is growing: Most operations in North America are at least offsetting some carbon emissions or actively trying to use more clean energy.

Yes, but so are US Dollars and other currencies. The growth of legitimate crypto usage is far higher than that of illicit usage. Transactions involving illicit addresses represented just 0.15% of cryptocurrency transaction volume in 2021 according to blockchain analytic firm Chainalysis.

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